Dernières publications saisies ou modifiées sur HAL

  • [hal-03422437] Human-Environment Observatory (OHM) Oyapock

    The study area stretches along both banks of the Oyapock river, a natural border between French Guiana and Brazil. The OHM is located entirely within the tropical rainforest, and includes the communities of Ouanary, Saint-Georges-del’Oyapock, Camopi on the French side, and the vast community of Oiapoque on the Brazilian side. Sparsely populated, this area is in the process of being opened up to the outside world with the recent opening of two roads that reach all the way to the river. The construction of this transborder river bridge should further accelerate these changes. The OHM aims to identify and monitor the key processes which will influence the human population and its environment, their interactions and their dynamics, after the construction of this bridge.

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  • [hal-03481268] Gérer et partager des données multidisciplinaires dans des Observatoires Hommes-Milieux : retours d’expérience du LabEx DRIIHM

    Le LabEx DRIIHM est un réseau de recherche qui regroupe 13 Observatoires Hommes-Milieux (OHMs) centrés sur l’étude des socio-écosystèmes modifiés par l'homme, en France et à l’étranger. Dans le cadre de la Science Ouverte, une Infrastructure de Données de Recherche (IDR) a été mise en place pour décrire, visualiser et diffuser les jeux de données multidisciplinaires et hétérogènes produits par la communauté. Cette IDR contient des outils et des standards développés à l'échelle du DRIIHM, et des outils spécifiques pour répondre aux besoins de chaque observatoire. Cette présentation décrit les éléments constitutifs de l’IDR. Une analyse des forces du dispositif et des défis qu’il reste à relever est menée sur la base des retours d’expérience des administrateurs de données et d’enquêtes auprès des utilisateurs. Cette analyse aboutit à des recommandations pour améliorer l’IDR, mieux mesurer son efficacité et renforcer la sensibilisation à la Science Ouverte. Le projet ANR SO-DRIIHM (2020-2023)[…]

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  • [hal-02311083] Workshop Timelines : Potentialities of chrono-systemic timelines to co-construct, analyze and communicate on the socio-ecological trajectories of OHMs

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  • [hal-02311053] Managing and sharing research outputs in the LabEx DRIIHM : The Data DRIIHM group supports you !

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  • [hal-02895247] Managing and sharing multidisciplinary information in human-environment observatories: feedbacks and recommendations from the French DRIIHM network

    The LabEx DRIIHM is a research network that gathers together 13 Human-Environment Observatories (OHM) focused on anthropogenically modified socio-ecosystems in France and worldwide. Within the open science context, a Research Data Infrastructure (RDI) was implemented brick by brick to describe, visualize, and disseminate multidisciplinary long-tail datasets produced by the DRIIHM community. The RDI contains both tools and standards at the network scale, and specific tools at the individual observatory scale. This paper describes the building blocks of the RDI and analyses its strengths and challenges on the basis of engineer feedback and user surveys. Recommendations for improving the RDI, better measuring its effectiveness, and enhancing open science awareness, have been formalized for the SO-DRIIHM project that will start in 2020. Cross-disciplinary approaches using DataViz tools have emerged already, and these enrich the way in which scientific information is disseminated, and could raise new scientific issues.

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  • [hal-03781675] Arboreal camera trap reveals the frequent occurrence of a frugivore-carnivore in neotropical nutmeg trees

    Abstract Arboreal and flying frugivorous animals represent primary dispersers in the Neotropics. Studies suggest a possible compensation for the loss of large species by smaller ones with expanding rampant anthropogenic pressures and declining populations of larger frugivores. However, studies on seed dispersal by frugivores vertebrates generally focus on the diurnal, terrestrial, canopy, and flying species, with the nocturnal canopy ones being less studied. Setting camera traps high in the canopy of fruiting nutmeg trees revealed for the first time the high frequency of the kinkajou ( Potos flavus , Schreber, 1774, Procyonidae), an overlooked nocturnal frugivore species (Order Carnivora) in the Guianas. The diversity of the fruit species consumed by the kinkajou calls for considering it as an important seed disperser. The overlap of the size of seeds dispersed by frugivores observed in nutmeg trees suggests that the small (2–5 kg) kinkajou may compensate for the loss of large (5–10 kg) frugivorous[…]

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  • [halsde-00676374] Botany, genetics and ethnobotany: a crossed investigation on the elusive tapir's diet in French Guiana.

    While the populations of large herbivores are being depleted in many tropical rainforests, the importance of their trophic role in the ecological functioning and biodiversity of these ecosystems is still not well evaluated. This is due to the outstanding plant diversity that they feed upon and the inherent difficulties involved in observing their elusive behaviour. Classically, the diet of elusive tropical herbivores is studied through the observation of browsing signs and macroscopic analysis of faeces or stomach contents. In this study, we illustrate that the original coupling of classic methods with genetic and ethnobotanical approaches yields information both about the diet diversity, the foraging modalities and the potential impact on vegetation of the largest terrestrial mammal of Amazonia, the lowland tapir. The study was conducted in the Guianan shield, where the ecology of tapirs has been less investigated. We identified 92 new species, 51 new genera and 13 new families[…]

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  • [pasteur-00634597] Treatment of leishmaniasis in the Oyapock basin (French Guiana): A K.A.P. survey and analysis of the evolution of phytotherapy knowledge amongst Wayãpi Indians.

    ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected disease with a high incidence in French Guiana, mainly in the middle and upper Oyapock basin, where Amerindian and some Brazilian people live. The main goals of this work were (i) to assess the knowledge about leishmaniasis in the different populations of the middle and upper Oyapock basin, (ii) to study the therapeutic strategies adopted by people affected by leishmaniasis and (iii) to document the use of phytotherapeutic remedies for leishmaniasis. Knowledge, attitudes and practices (K.A.P.) related to this disease and its treatments have been studied according to cultural group and geographical settlement. Within the Wayãpi group, the evolution of the knowledge of phytoremedies over the last 20 years has been characterised by literature-based comparisons. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 144 questionnaires were administered in all the villages of the upper Oyapock and Camopi basins. Correspondence analyses were used for multivariate analysis.[…]

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  • [mnhn-02150399] The discret journey of plants: Abelmoschus moschatus (Malvaceae) and Zingiber zerumbet (Zingiberaceae) in the Neotropics

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  • [hal-02276947] Long‐term influence of early human occupations on current forests of the Guiana Shield

    To decipher the long-term influences of pre-Columbian land occupations on contemporary forest structure, diversity, and functioning in Amazonia, most of the previous research focused on the alluvial plains of the major rivers of the Amazon basin. Terra firme, that is, nonflooded forests, particularly from the Guiana Shield, are yet to be explored. In this study, we aim to give new insights into the subtle traces of pre-Columbian influences on present-day forests given the archaeological context of terra firme forests of the Guiana Shield. Following archaeological prospects on 13 sites in French Guiana, we carried out forest inventories inside and outside archaeological sites and assessed the potential pre-Columbian use of the sampled tree species using an original ethnobotanical database of the Guiana Shield region. Aboveground biomass (320 and 380 T/ha, respectively), basal area (25–30 and 30–35 m2/ha, respectively), and tree density (550 and 700 stem/ha, respectively) were all significantly lower on anthropized[…]

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  • [hal-02276560] Hunting in French Guiana Across Time, Space and Livelihoods

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  • [hal-01791709] Une base de données au service d’un bassin de vie (badobavie) : création et structuration de la donnée territoriale dans le bassin de l’oyapock (Guyane française et Amapá brésilienne)

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  • [tel-01764244] Biodiversité et maladies infectieuses: Impact des activités humaines sur le cycle de transmission des leishmanioses en Guyane

    Selon l’hypothèse de l'effet de dilution, les écosystèmes les plus riches en espèces seraient également les moins propices à la circulation des agents infectieux du fait de la présence d'hôtes non compétents constituant des impasses épidémiologiques. Dans cette thèse, nous explorons l’existence de ce phénomène sur le modèle des leishmanioses cutanées zoonotiques en Guyane. Des outils moléculaires basés sur l’utilisation des technologies de séquençage haut-débit ont été développés pour étudier le système épidémiologique. Ces outils ont ensuite été employés pour caractériser le cycle de transmission des leishmanioses dans des sites forestiers sujets à différents niveaux de perturbation d’origine humaine. Nos résultats semblent globalement congruents avec l’hypothèse de l’effet de dilution, et indiquent un risque infectieux plus élevé sur le site le plus perturbé. Toutefois, les différences observées entre les sites ne sont pas significatives et d’avantage de données seraient nécessaires pour tirer des conclusions générales.

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  • [hal-01761679] The trans-riverine genetic structure of 28 Amazonian frog species is dependent on life history

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  • [hal-03534348] Amazonian mammal monitoring using aquatic environmental DNA

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  • [hal-03534339] Characterizing the spatial signal of environmental DNA in river systems using a community ecology approach

    Abstract Environmental DNA (eDNA) is gaining a growing popularity among scientists but its applicability to biodiversity research and management remains limited in river systems by the lack of knowledge about the spatial extent of the downstream transport of eDNA. Here, we assessed the ability of eDNA inventories to retrieve spatial patterns of fish assemblages along two large and species rich Neotropical rivers. We first examined overall community variation with distance through the distance decay of similarity and compared this pattern to capture-based samples. We then considered previous knowledge on individual species distributions, and compared it to the eDNA inventories for a set of 53 species. eDNA collected from 28 sites in the Maroni and 25 sites in the Oyapock rivers permitted to retrieve a decline of species similarity with distance between sites. The distance decay of similarity derived from eDNA was similar, and even more pronounced, than that obtained with[…]

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  • [hal-01761584] iDNA screening: Disease vectors as vertebrate samplers

    In the current context of global change and human-induced biodiversity decline, there is an urgent need for developing sampling approaches able to accurately describe the state of biodiversity. Traditional surveys of vertebrate fauna involve time-consuming and skill-demanding field methods. Recently, the use of DNA derived from invertebrate parasites (leeches and blowflies) was suggested as a new tool for vertebrate diversity assessment. Bloodmeal analyses of arthropod disease vectors have long been performed to describe their feeding behaviour, for epidemiological purposes. On the other hand, this existing expertise has not yet been applied to investigate vertebrate fauna per se. Here, we evaluate the usefulness of hematophagous dipterans as vertebrate samplers. Blood-fed sand flies and mosquitoes were collected in Amazonian forest sites and analysed using high-throughput sequencing of short mitochondrial markers. Bloodmeal identifications highlighted contrasting ecological features and feeding behaviour among dipteran species, which allowed unveiling arboreal and terrestrial mammals of various body[…]

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  • [hal-01254935] Revision of vernacular names for the freshwater fish of French Guiana

    The fish fauna of French Guiana is one of the best described in the geographical area covering theGuiana Shield. Paradoxically, however, there is no summary document validated by ethnologists and specializedlinguists that links the scientific names of the fish of this area to their vernacular names from the differentlanguage groups. In this paper, we compile the presently existing data on species and vernacular names collectedover several decades in Creole, Amerindian (Kali’na, Palikur, Wayana, Wayãpi and Teko), Nenges or Maroons(Boni, Ndjuka and Sranan Tongo) languages as well as French and/or specialist aquarium terms and BrazilianPortuguese. Of the 416 fish species found in French Guiana, we can assign a common name to 85% of them byconsidering all these languages as a group. These common names can be more or less generic, covering a greateror lesser number of species that are similar or very close in their external morphology. The fish currently withoutcommon[…]

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  • [hal-01791715] Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the Oyapock basin. How ethnobotany is a provider of botanical material for the CAY herbarium ?

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  • [hal-01791717] Unidades paísajísticas de la cuenca del Camopí, una etnoecología del ambiente teko (Guiana francesa)

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